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CBC: B.C. business leaders announce campaign in support of Trans Mountain pipeline

Representatives of industry associations met in Vancouver on Thursday morning to announce plans for a campaign supporting the completion of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

The assembled business leaders said they believe that Canada's reputation as a safe place to invest is at risk if Kinder Morgan's plans for the pipeline aren't allowed to proceed.

"We're at a point of crisis of confidence in Canada, a crisis that needs leadership and immediate attention to resolve," Greg D'Avignon, president and CEO of the Business Council of British Columbia, told reporters.

The group have written a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, B.C. Premier John Horgan and Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, urging them to take action to make sure the pipeline expansion is completed.

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The Daily Hive: Business Council of BC pledges support for Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project

Saying the issue “is no longer about a pipeline project or whether one supports or opposes the legal movement of energy in Canada,” BC business representatives held a conference on Thursday to officially pledge their support of seeing the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project completed.

BC’s decision to “prolong a process that rendered a verdict two years ago and move the regulatory finish line by imposing new barriers that would undercut its potential, threatens the credibility of our country’s regulatory and project approvals systems and, by extension, the foundation of our federation,” said Greg D’Avignon, President and CEO of the Business Council of BC (BCBC).

“Provoked by the BC government’s continued position, this is a referendum on whether British Columbia is open to investment and whether a legal enterprise can, with any confidence, invest, build and operate a business within the province and the country,” he added. “The political rhetoric must stop now.”

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Globe and Mail: Trudeau, Notley and Horgan to hold Trans Mountain summit

[EXCERPT]

At a news conference in Vancouver, business leaders and other supporters of Kinder Morgan’s project said they are worried about “confidence in Canada” declining.

The group warned Mr. Trudeau in an open letter sent on Thursday that the Trans Mountain impasse “threatens to provoke a crisis of confidence in Canada’s regulatory processes with far-reaching implications which go well beyond this project.”

Greg D’Avignon, chief executive officer of the Business Council of British Columbia, signed the letter along with dozens of leaders from a wide range of industries and communities.

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Calgary Herald: Crisis, what crisis? Businesses fear fallout as pipeline clock ticks

[EXCERPT]

On the west coast, the same sentiment prevails within the business community, which wants to see a concerted federal push to get Trans Mountain finished.

“This is no longer about a pipeline project, it’s about whether or not you can invest with confidence in any business in B.C. or frankly in Canada,” said Greg D’Avignon, president of the Business Council of British Columbia. 

"This, in my m ind, is a real crisis of leadership for the country."

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Global News: ‘A crisis of confidence’: B.C. businesses want Trudeau to stand firm on Kinder Morgan pipeline

More than 70 business, industry and community groups have signed an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asking for the uncertainty around the Trans Mountain pipeline to end.

Groups like the B.C. Chamber of Commerce and the Business Council of British Columbia say business confidence is being shaken because of rising tensions on either side of the Rocky Mountains.

“We’re here today because the organizations and individuals in communities and businesses across this country believe we are at a point or crisis of confidence in Canada. A crisis that needs leadership and immediate attention to resolve,” says Greg D’Avignon, the president and CEO of the Business Council of British Columbia.

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Globe and Mail: Business leaders target B.C. over suspension of 'non-essential' spending on Trans Mountain Pipeline

[EXCERPT]

"There is a real crisis in confidence in B.C. - and in Canada," warned Greg D'Avignon, president and CEO of the Business Council of B.C., in an interview Monday.

"This is a national issue. We can't rely on the regulatory process, the rule of law, with any degree of confidence. I think the federation is at risk and it's corrosive."

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Surrey Now Leader B.C. blasted for Trans Mountain pipeline tactics

The Business Council of B.C. is calling for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to meet with B.C. Premier John Horgan to resolve the standoff over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

“This is no longer about a pipeline project or whether one supports or opposes the legal movement of energy in Canada, which all Canadians and our economy rely on,” said Greg D’Avignon, president of the business council.

“Provoked by the B.C. government’s continued position, this is a referendum on whether British Columbia is open to investment and whether a legal enterprise can, with any confidence, build and operate a business within the province and the country.”

Also featured in:

The Comox Valley Record

Columbia Valley Pioneer

Merritt Herald

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Times Colonist: Business groups, Opposition denounce B.C. obstruction amid pipeline delay

[EXCERPT]

Greg D'Avignon, president of the B.C. Business Council, says the provincial government's decision to prolong the process by imposing new barriers threatens the credibility of the country's regulatory and project approval systems.

Also featured in:

National Post

National Observer

The Province

Castanet

Vancouver Courier

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Victoria News: High housing costs can be a policy headache

[EXCERPT]

Ken Peacock, chief economist and vice-president of the Business Council of British Columbia, said speculators are just one part of the problem. He thinks the government tried to slow the rise of home prices, and maybe even level them off, but by using the tax to change public behaviour and raise revenue, the government has placed themselves in “a tricky situation.”

“B.C. is a desirable place to live. [There are] land constraints in the Lower Mainland, steady inflows of immigration, inter-provincial migration. Add that all up, and there’s a fair amount of demand … The fundamental is that there is excess demand over supply in the housing which will drive up prices over time.”

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The Province, Mike Smyth: The taxman cometh and you will pay more starting on April 1

EXCERPT: 

Employer Health Tax: This new payroll tax replaces unpopular Medical Services Plan premiums, which the government is phasing out. But if you think a tax on employers won't hurt employees, think again.

I'm already hearing from blindsided business owners who say thy have no choice but to pass the tax on to their customers in the form of higher prices. The tax cold also trigger layoffs and cancel pay raises, the B.C. Business Council warns.

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Edmonton Journal: Alberta Energy Minister not pleased after B.C. announces rebates, conditions for LNG Projects

EXCERPT: 

The Business Council of British Columbia said the framework will provide more regulatory certainty and important fiscal incentives for potential investors across industries. 

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Vancouver Sun: B.C. Premier John Horgan offers tax breaks to boost LNG industry

EXCERPT:

B.C. Business Council president Greg D’Avignon said the LNG tax changes could produce a valuable industry for the province.

“This will create new jobs in B.C., strengthen our economy and generate billions of new government revenues over time, while also contributing to the reduction of global carbon emissions,” he said.

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Globe and Mail: B.C. offers rebates, new conditions for LNG projects in province

EXCERPT:

The Business Council of British Columbia said the framework will provide more regulatory certainty and important fiscal incentives for potential investors across industries.

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CBC: High speed rail between Vancouver, Seattle and Portland inches closer to reality

[Excerpt]

The B.C. Business Council says up to 500 people travel between Vancouver and Seattle each day to work in the tech sector and describes the two cities as growing technology hubs.

Greg D'Avignon, the president and CEO of the BCBC says a high speed rail line would help support job creation.

"This is just one of the pieces of the puzzle that would be necessary for us to be a global city that's really competing in the knowledge economy," he said.

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BIV on Roundhouse March 9: Businesses boost support for women entrepreneurs

BIV on Roundhouse - March 8, 2018

From the Business Council of BC, Denise Mullen discusses women and work in British Columbia. [14:15]

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Okanagan Edge: Why the gender gap matters

In honour of International Women’s Day, Okanagan Edge today presents the first of a series of blogs examining the place of British Columbian women in the workplace.

Penned by authors at the Business Council of B.C., the six-part series explores issues such as the gender pay gap; women’s labour force participation; the link between education, child care, and missed opportunities; and women’s entrepreneurship and self-employment.

As the president of BCBC, Greg D'Avignon, points out, “women’s labour force participation is not simply a women’s issue. It is a complex topic with broad economic impacts.”

In this series, authors Denise Mullen and Kristine St-Laurent break down some of those impacts, starting today with the gender gap, and why it matters.

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Globe and Mail: Real Estate Job Sector Balloons in BC

[Excerpt]

Jock Finlayson, economist and chief policy officer for Business Council of B.C., says that people believe real estate, particularly sales, is a high-income profession that requires little training or education. Those jobs are likely on the rise because they are seen as easy money, especially when agents at the top of their game are earning millions of dollars.

"A lot of people are attracted to the industry because of the perception that there is a lot of money to be made, and of course there has been for those who are very successful, an extraordinary amount of money," he says.

"It's quite astonishing, the commission sales model in the real estate industry. It has seemingly been impervious to technological change and innovation that in so many other industries has driven out the extra costs around transactions.

 

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Globe and Mail: Notley threatens to turn off oil taps in dispute with B.C. over Trans Mountain pipeline

[Excerpt]

Jock Finlayson, executive vice-president at the Business Council of B.C, said if crude oil is no longer flowing west to the Burnaby refinery, which supplies roughly a third of Southern B.C.'s demand for gasoline, then gas prices in the province could jump significantly.

 

Fuel shortages could develop and B.C. would need to increase its imports of both crude and refined petroleum from the United States and other countries, he added. "The economic impac obviously would be negative, since energy prices for B.C. businesses and consumers would be higher and there would be a scramble to find alternative fuel supply," he said on Thursday in an e-mailed statement. "If Alberta cut off supplies of refined petroleum products and not just of crude oil, the impact would be greater."

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Vancouver Courier: Finance minister: Canada’s response to Trump tariffs will be ‘appropriate but firm’

Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s says Canada’s response to possible tariffs by the U.S. will be “appropriate but firm,” adding that Canada is a key partner to the United States supply chain.

Questions on the economic saber rattling between Canada and U.S. President Donald Trump dominated Morneau’s visit to Vancouver on Tuesday, both at a discussion session with the Business Council of British Columbia and later at the UBC campus. He said Canada’s approach to recent policy decisions by the U.S. government, namely an imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum, will be measured in nature.

“If required, we will be firm in our response, appropriate but firm,” Morneau said without going into detail what a response may look like or whether there is the option of pulling out of the talks for a new North American Free Trade Agreement. “We don’t see that linking steel and NAFTA is going to help us to get to an agreement.”

He was in town to promote the federal government’s 2018 budget and sat down with Vancouver’s business community at the Fairmont Pacific Rim to answer questions on the Canadian economy.

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CBC: Canada well-positioned to handle NAFTA turmoil: Morneau

A strong economy is allowing Canadian officials to push for a better deal in negotiations on the North American Free Trade Agreement, Finance Minister Bill Morneau said Tuesday.

Talks on the deal are "critically important" but Canada will remain firm in getting the best possible agreement, he told the Business Council of British Columbia.

"Are there challenges? Yes. Do we need to be prepared to deal with them? Yes. We think that having our economy in the best possible position is the place from which we can do that, make decisions in a measured way, considering all the facts at hand," he said.

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